An Interview with Irish Alternative Rock Band Stone Sea

So, I would Like to preface this interview by saying that this my first time doing this, so I’m really excited and kinda nervous.

Nothing to be nervous mate, We are all new here and we’re excited to do this interview too.

Alright, thanks. I would just like to say that I love your work a lot and I’m really excited to see what you have in store for the future.

Okay, so let’s begin the interview.

`1. Would you guys please introduce yourselves and explain your role in the band?
Elvis Suhadolnik Bonesso – Lead Singer and Guitarist
Connor Middleton – Drums
Jonathan Parminter – Bass and Backing Vocals

2. Where did you guys meet and how did you form this band?
Well, Stone Sea originally started in Brazil around 2014, recording and releasing “Origins” in 2015, same year that Elvis traveled to Ireland where he reformed the band and recorded the EP’s “Vaporizer” (2017) and “Mankind Maze” (2019). The band had a line up change in 2019 and now counts with Jonathan in the bass and Connor in the drums.
Connor was the first to join the band, he had already seen a gig here in Dublin of which he really liked. When Elvis was doing some trials with new drummers, for his vision and his skills on the drums, he was chosen. Same with Jonathan actually but he just join the band around a month before the Irish tour releasing song by song of Mankind Maze.
Jonathan and Connor are now studying in the music college here in Dublin.

3. What kind of music do you make or would like to make in the future?
We are still experimenting some stuff. What we want to do is to bring more world music to our sound. We feel there’s a great connection between music from the root of civilizations and a crunchy and obese instrumentation.

4. What do you enjoy the most about the process of making music together?
The fact that we, individually, bring different ideas and influences. There’s always something interesting in blending styles and influences; it’s basically crafting newborn aliens.

5. What are some of your favorite themes to explore through your music?
Feelings and the subconscious mind. In other words things that cannot be described without ambiguity. I’d say is our way of exploring things we don’t understand, so we let them describe themselves in lyrics and wave forms.

6. Who are some artists that you love or who you’d say has had a huge influence on your work?
Black Sabbath and Nirvana had a huge influence in our work, but there are many more we could point out. Electric Wizard, Mr. Bungle, Megadeth, Slayer, Type O Negative, Pantera they all had their share on impacting our sound, somehow.

7. Where can someone looking for your music, find it?
Anywhere! We are on Spotify (Stone Sea), Youtube (/c/stonesea), Deezer, Bandcamp, Soundcloud. Not to mention our social platforms Facebook (/stoneseamusic) and Instagram (@stoneseaband).

8. What’s your favorite part about touring/ doing live performances?
Connection with life, people, places, cultures. Always refreshing to our minds to get to know new things. By discovering them we discover more about ourselves.

9. What kind of message would you like to give your fans, through your music?
That life isn’t made to be understood, but to be created.

10. Where do you guys see yourselves in the future, or what are you future plans for the band?
At the moment we are about to release a new music video for an alternative version of a song from “Mankind Maze”, we have a bunch of new tunes to be recorded, there’s also a UK tour planned for September but due to the Corona Virus situation it might be postponed, so keep an eye in our social media platforms!

Movie Review: Bad Education – The True Crime HBO drama is the best “New” Movie out there.

Bad Education; Dir – Cory Finley

Rating – /Must see if you’re a fan./ (Plus, it’s free you know.)

Just the day after Netflix released it’s big budget film starring Chris Hemsworth, HBO is here to compete with its Hugh Jackman and Alison Janney film based on a real life school scandal. And yeah, it’s probably the best piece of new content we have got in this time of scarcity.

The top administrators at the Roslyn, New York, school district seemed not only to understand this instinct but also to exploit it for their own personal gain. “Bad Education” explores their real-life embezzlement scheme, which came crashing down when the high-school newspaper broke the story in 2004. Spending nearly $8 million on a sky bridge to beautify a campus seems reasonable when you’re trying to exude an aura of success—when you’re the fourth-ranked district in the country, gunning for that No. 1 spot. With that much money flying around, skimming a little here and there for a bagel or jewelry or renovations on your beach house in the Hamptons is no biggie.

Director Cory Finley finds the dark humor within this scandal, which he depicts with wit, style and a terrific cast. Hugh Jackman does some of the best work of his long and varied career as the superintendent, Dr. Frank Tassone, whose charisma and polished image disguised a multitude of secrets. Jackman plays on his usual charm and looks to great effect. But there’s something sinister within the slickness that’s unsettling from the first time we see him, spritzing cologne and trimming nose hairs in the mirror of the boys’ bathroom in extreme close-up. Frank clearly cares deeply and works hard to recall names and personal details of students and parents alike throughout the district; we can still see glimmers of the calling that drew him to this challenging profession in the first place. Fundamentally, he’s a pleaser and he wants to be liked—yet increasingly, he savors the fame and power that come with being in a position of authority in an affluent community. And as Frank and his second-in-command (played brilliantly by a brash Allison Janney) find themselves squirming to survive when their $11.2 million scheme comes to light, their flaws and follies become even more glaringly evident.

Finley’s follow-up to “Thoroughbreds” one of my favorite films of 2018, doesn’t seek to dazzle with sleek, showy camerawork like that film did. But it’s similarly interested in mining the depths of out darkest impulses, and doing so with sharp satire. (Mike Makowsky, who was a middle school student in Roslyn when the embezzlement scandal broke, wrote the script.) “Bad Education” also calls to mind the great Alexander Payne  film “Election” with its students who are smarter and savvier than you’d expect and teachers who aren’t as mature and responsible as you’d hope. Finley actually could have used a bit more of Payne’s sharp bite in tackling this material. Geraldine Vishwanathan radiates a quiet but increasingly assertive confidence as the high school reporter whose tough questions and thorough document searches reveal the district’s financial irregularities. Just as compelling as what she finds is her internal debate over how to handle that information. She knows what’s the right thing to do—but what if that’s the wrong move for her future?

Overall, it’s a really well made and tight drama that sheds light on some important issues. You can stream it for free on HBO and it’s not like you don’t have any free time, so just log in and give it a watch. And if you’ve seen it, do let me know what you thought about it in the comments.

Movie Review: Extraction-Great performances and stunt work save this generic Netflix actioner.

Extraction; Dir- Sam Hargrave

Rating- //stream it once it’s free// (that’s kinda ironic considering it’s a Netflix movie)

“Extraction. Indian kid. Drug lord’s son. A rival gangster is holding this kid in Dhaka,” a character tells Chris Hemsworth in the first act, explaining the whole plot (and the title) of the movie. Clearly, subtlety is not this movie’s forte. But let’s be real, this Netflix action movie releasing during quarantine, who cares it has a nuanced story? But does it have enough bloody action to compensate for it? Yeah, it does.

There’s nothing new in the story of Extraction, we’ve seen all this countless times now. The plot beats are predictable, and the messy and convoluted script by Joe Russo doesn’t do it any help. But enough action set pieces, great performances, and surprises make sure to hold your attention for it near two hours runtime. Also, the heart to heart moments that this film tries have as breathers in between action set pieces don’t work at all. They don’t make us care for the character and needlessly stretches the runtime.

First-time director Sam Hargrave, making a switch from serving as a stunt coordinator in popular MCU movies like Avengers: Endgame, is surely trying to pull off a Chad Stahelski/David Leitch here. And though the action in Extraction is never as innovative or beautiful as in the John Wick movies, it does come close. The fight scenes are choreographed with equal attention, but they are dirtier and less smoothly executed in here. Nonetheless, it the best action in a major Netflix release to date. And yeah, everyone’s talking about the one-take shot midway through the film, and yeah, it’s worth the hype. I also need to appreciate Sam Hargrave’s effort as an action director here and his willingness to do the dirty work himself, he’s surely here to stay. The camera work in this movie is commendable as well. The shots are long and wide, so the action is clearly visible and you feel the rush. There’s a little over-usage of hand-held camera, but let’s cut the crap, nobody is complaining about that. Oh and yes, if you don’t like blood and gore… why do you even wanna watch an action movie?

What might set this movie apart from other generic action movies, are the locations and the fantastic cast. The decision to use Dhaka as a backdrop to the film has really paid off, as it adds an extra layer of tension and dynamic to the film. But the yellow filter throughout the whole movie is a little overdone though – we get it, it’s a rugged down city. Chris Hemsworth is perfectly believable as the man who can do the job, I mean the dude’s Thor for real. He keeps it simple and delivers an effective and emotional performance. Randeep Hooda is brilliant as always, and makes for a really good action star. He is the only character in the movie that gets the chance to shine other than Chris Hemsworth. Rudhraksh Jaiswal, who plays the main kid, does a fairly good job even though his performance comes through as annoying sometimes. Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani kicks ass in the little screen time she’s got and looks stunning doing it. Other big names like David Harbour, Pankaj Tripathi, Priyanshu Painyullu do the best of the little they are given.

In conclusion, extraction is not anything great but it has enough fun action to keep you entertained and if you’re a soft heart, maybe even pull some heartstrings towards the end. That’s pretty good for something you can watch for free at the comfort for home and let’s not forget it’s the only new movie to release in last two week. So, go check it out Netflix whenever you can, it’s not like you’ve something better to do sitting at home. It might just be some harmless fun, but in times like these, we could surely use some of that.

Album Review: Fetch the Bolt Cutters – Fiona Apple’s fifth record is bonkers and deliriously beautiful.

FETCH THE BOLT CUTTERS – FIONA APPLE (Alternative/Indie)

Rating – “It’s great” / worth adding to your collection.

According to recent “New Yorker” article, “Fetch the Bolt Cutters” is a reference to a scene in “The Fall,” the British police procedural starring Gillian Anderson as a sex-crimes investigator; Anderson’s character calls out the phrase after finding a locked door to a room where a girl has been tortured. This theme of crimes against women, men in power and femininity appears throughout the whole album. Like all of Apple’s projects, this one was taking a long while to emerge, arriving through a slow-drip process of creative self-interrogation that has produced, over a quarter century, a narrow but deep songbook. But that time surely helped Fiona in the direction of the album, since in between all those years she kept quiet, big movements like The #Metoo Movement has shaped the entertainment industry.

Fiona Apple has been in the business for 25 years now, but this is only her fifth full length album. And while she has always worked under a male producer in her early career, this is her first album that she has produced herself and she has made to let it all loose. Musically, this is easily the craziest and most bonkers production on an album I have heard this year. And unless you can find another song from this year that features a dog’s bones as percussion, I’ll have to say that my claim is right. It has some of the most innovative sonic directions on a recent EP, even considering Fiona’s standards. For example the title track – Fetch the Bolt Cutters – features a dog’s barking noise as bass and Fiona’s orgasmic noises in the outro, Also on the opening track – I Want You to Love Me – the singer hiccups in ecstasy, facing off against an arpeggiating piano as though competing to climax first. And the piano in here is a masterpiece in itself, but that’s obvious, given Fiona’s reputation as pianist.

Lyrically too, Fiona is taking a lot of shots in this album. Just like the Strokes album from last week (another artist making a comeback this year), there’s a lot of looking back in this albums. Fiona looks back at her childhood in New York, growing up as a musical prodigy and getting fame at an early age of 17 in the uneasy times of 90’s. Men in power who who use women for their benefits and sexual predators are definitely are the first target of Fiona. And even though the music behind the song is overblown, Fiona doesn’t compensate on the lyrics, the songs here are very wordy, even more than they’ve ever been. What set’s the lyrics in this project apart, is that even though it’s dealing with such heavy subjects – they are funny as hell. But that’s not all in here, Fiona talks about past relationships, bad boyfriends, her younger self and even takes shots at high society culture. In fact major her own mind and trying to figure herself out by glancing at the past is one of the major themes. “I would beg to disagree, but begging disagrees with me,” she swaggers on Under the Table, a wickedly funny song about how she is a nightmare date at pompous dinner parties. (“Kick me under the table all you want.”)

Fav Tracks – I Want You to Love Me/ Shameika/ Fetch the Bolt Cutters/ Under The Table/ Newspaper/ Ladies/ Drumset/ On I go/ Cosmonauts/ Rack of life/

Least Fav Track – Heavy Baloon

In conclusion, all I want to say is this it is a really good album that doesn’t fear to take any risks and even if you are not into R&B or indie music, you should definitely give this album a listen. I mean it’s not like you have much else to do right now. Trust me, give it a try and maybe you will be able to appreciate all it’s weirdness too.

And meanwhile, do let me know what you thought about the album in the comments!

Why Looking for Alaska on Hulu is the perfect adaptation?

Nostalgia. That is what this show was for me. I was in 7th grade when I read John Green’s novel and fell in love with Alaska. Like for real, I loved her. And if it’s possible I love her even more now. For all the scenes Alaska Young (Kristen Froseth) was on screen, all I wanted to do was reach out and give her a hug. But let’s keep the stuff about why I love her for later. It is a long story (and kinda personal) and that is not the purpose of this article. Also this is not a review, I know I’m way too late for that. This post is just to examine why Looking for Alaska is the perfect example of how to adapt a popular book.

The best decision right away was to adapt the book into a limited series. When I first heard that, I was kinda disappointed as I thought a movie would bring in more viewers and make more people familiar with the source material. I know, sounds stupid but that’s what my scrawny ass believed. In hindsight, that would’ve been a really bad idea. What sets this adaptation apart from other John Green adaptations is the character development and time given to each and every side character to completely flesh them out. While both Fault in our stars and Papertowns are decent movies they are never able to figure out their characters completely. The Augustus Water from the movie is not fearless boy from book, and Margo Roth Spiegelman from the movie never represents the bad-ass she is in the book. But in Looking for Alaska every character is fully lived and realized, from the show’s lead Miles to The Colonel and even The Eagle.

Also the decision my makers to make it a limited series and not stretch it to further seasons (looking at you 13 Reasons Why), was great as it allowed for a really satisfying ending. The show really take it’s time with every bit and then ends each if them them brilliantly. It is a slow-burn, but I promise will suck you in and shatter you by the end of it. I have read the book around three-four times, so I didn’t think it was possible to feel this emotional watching those same event happen. But trust me, the cried every time a emotional scene happened, that’s how good the execution of the show is.

The show has been adapted fairly faithfully and the characters and settings are very authentic to the book. And it is one the rare occurrences, where I agree with the show every time they deviated from the book. Like the prank in last episode (no spoilers) was a brilliant idea to add to the story. Also, some characters from the book have been given extra time in the show to flesh them into more complete dynamic people, like say Dr, Hyde or Takumi, which makes the show even more compelling. And the decision to give six episodes to the “Before” part of the story and two episodes to the “After” part of the story, instead of the almost equal divide in the book, really paid off in my opinion.

I was also really surprised by the quality of the show. It is really well written and shot. The cinematography is gorgeous and the direction is really good. Also, kudos to the casting department, the cast in the show is perfect. Each actor exactly embodies the characters as I imagined them to be when I read the book. Charlie Plummer and Kristine Froseth are perfectly paired, they look beautiful and yet heartbreaking together. Special mention to Denny Love, that dude really was The Colonel and in my opinion very the the breakout in this cast. Jay Lee, Sofia Vassilieva, Landry Bender. Uriah Shelton, Jordan Connor all do justice to their roles and deliver worthy performances. So if you’re stuck home and really bored during this quarantine/lockdown just go and check out this amazing show. This show deserves to be watched.

In conclusion all I wanna say is – I love you Alaska, and I will always keep looking for you.

“Sing to me, Muse”

Rising Sun in the rear mirror.
Brittle breeze sniffing on the red scarf
That she wraps around her neck
Hiding the tattoo she was given at birth.

The wretched river follows us right by the side
Of the road we’ve been ridin’ through all night
Through dark forests that smell of dead corpse
Filled with fireflies and nymphs playing harps.

She looks like she was brought down from heaven
Just for me,
She’s the one they call by the name ‘Raven’
She’s come to set me free.

She’s more beautiful than I can comprehend
Her eyes looking at me with reminiscence
Her face makes me wanna sing
In voices I can’t listen.

I don’t know where she’s leading me,
But I want to follow her
No matter how far
It’s not like I have a bigger purpose to serve.

She shines with a glistening glow
As the newborn sun kisses her face.
“Your life’s shorter than your shadow,
Ever wonder why you’re here, what’s your place?”

Born in the city of bones, I have never been bold
All my life I have done as I was told.
The thought of my place in this world never appeared
Or it did, and I taught myself to not think hard.

She turns her head and whispers, staring into my soul
“I know you have stories to tell, Sing them to me all”

I have always had a guitar
I want to play it to her
And even though I never learned to play it
I hit the strings, making up words to go with it.

“Sing to me, that’s all I ask of you
When the time comes, you will leave and forget all about me
But I want you to remember the songs you sing right now
Keep em’ and one day when you’re old, sing them in memory of me.”

“Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns
The man who sits on his throne, as the whole world burns”

Album Review: The New Abnormal by The Strokes

**Before I begin, since this is my first review on the blog I think I should explain my rating system here. I don’t want to use the usual star or number rating system as I’m unable to put my verdict of something I consume in numerical terms. Instead, I’ll try to rate them in terms of what I feel of them. So here’s the rating metric I’m going to use, from best to worst :

  1. Instant / Classic
  2. “It’s great” / worth adding to your collection.
  3. Must listen/ see/ read if you’re a fan.
  4. //stream it once it’s free//
  5. //meh..//
  6. //fun for the high time//
  7. //skip it.//
  8. Horrendous. Piece. Of. Shit.

So i guess we’re good to go.**

THE NEW ABNORMAL – THE STROKES

Rating – “It’s great” /worth adding to your collection.

Okay, I should tell you that this is my first Strokes album. I was born in 2001, so I missed out on the early 2000s hype surrounding them. And their work since then has really been sub-par, with a really uneventful 2010s for them. But I know about them and I understand why they’re so beloved by so many. I have listened to their earlier music and I love it. So, when I heard “At the Door”, their latest single from their new album, I was super hyped. I was about to witness my first Strokes album.

And honestly I’m not disappointed. After seven years of hiatus have finally come back with an album which is possibly their best since their 2006 album “First impressions of the truth.” And what better, they have matured a lot since then, which is very evident on this project. The Strokes are known to look back at earlier periods like the eighties and pay homage to them, and while they still do that in this album, they are also looking back at something more. They are reminiscing at their early times as a band, New York from when they were young and past friendships and relationships among others. This nostalgia drives the sound of this album. The guitar riffs and over the top synths are very 80’s in here, which is very classic of the Strokes, yet they add to that sound in here. They beautifully nudge between poppy dance rock and ambient rock ballads, supported by the high pitched falsetto of Julian Casablancas and his extraordinary vocal abilities.

Lyrically too, The Strokes have matured a lot. Their ideas are more clear and easy to digest in this album. The lyrics are simple and dark, and while it might seem pretentious at some points, Julian’s delivery makes them work. The themes of the album are petty universal, so almost anybody will be able to connect to the lyrics. Also, the writing here is really witty and smart which adds to the fun of the songs. While there’s no storyline per se in the album, the overall themes connect beautifully. Each track has it’s own thing to say and they all together complete the story that the Strokes are trying to paint here. For example the opening track “The Adults are Talking” is shot at people in power or rich businessmen, followed by “Selfless” which is a rock ballad where Julian sings about an old romance, while the album ends on “An ode to the Mets” where The strokes talk about their childhood memories and give a tribute to their city – New York.

Fav Tracks: At the Door, Ode to the Mets, Bad decisions, Brooklyn Bridge to Chorus, Selfless, The Adults are Talking, Not The same anymore.

Least Fav Tracks: Why Are Sunday’s so Depressing

Overall, I loved this album. While it might not be a classic like The Stroke’s debut album “Is this It”, “The New Abnormal” is the best work they have put out in recent memory. It is great album and if you love the Strokes, you should definitely buy it and add it to your collection.

So that’s it for this, I’ll be back with another review shortly. Do let me know what you thought about the album in the comment below!

A Kurt Cobain Appreciation post; on his 26th Death Anniversary

Kurt Cobain means a lot to me. Not just his music, but him as person. How does someone who’s been dead for longer than I’ve been alive, affect my life so much? I don’t know, but that’s the power Kurt had – he influenced and connected with an entire generation. Like Lars Ulrich of Metallica said “with Kurt Cobain you felt you were connecting to the real person, not to a perception of who he was — you were not connecting to an image or a manufactured cut-out. You felt that between you and him there was nothing — it was heart-to-heart. There are very few people who have that ability”

Now I don’t know what it must’ve felt like hearing the news of Kurt’s suicide on 5th April 1994 at the age of 27 (though the body was discovered three days later), but from what I’ve heard, it’s one the saddest days in rock history. I know this much, if I were alive back then I would probably lock myself in a room for the whole day and not talk to anyone. But that’s not what happened. In fact I only started to listen to nirvana’s music two years back. I had obviously heard of them and listened to smells like teen spirit, but other than that no real connection. But over the past two years they have grown to become one of my favorite bands of all time.

A portrait of the young man as an artist. For his eighth birthday in February 1975, Kurt received this easel from his paternal grandparents. Comic book characters were his favorite art subjects in childhood; he began with Disney-related fare, such as Donald Duck, but quickly moved to superheroes. Here, Kurt is copying the cover from Giant-Size Werewolf #4, an April 1975 Marvel comic.

Now this post isn’t about nirvana’s music or a review of their entire catalog, I just wanted to share with you my love Kurt Cobain and what he means to me. I feel a lot of personal connection with Kurt, things about his early life that reflect my own. Kurt had a tough childhood, a dysfunctional family and his parents divorced when he was small. He loved comic books and would sit in his class making drawings and sketches. He developed hatred for his father as he lived with him and later his mother, whose boyfriend abused her, which really left a emotional stain on Kurt. Kurt didn’t like sports but still pretended to be interested and played with others in school. He listened to classical and punk rock songs with passion since he was a kid. He also suffered from diseases like bronchitis from a very early age. He later fell prey to chronic diseases like depression in high school and also spent a period homeless. Now, these are not reasons to love someone, but somewhere, I feel Kurt would understand my life since it’s so much similar to his. But the most important thing is he survived through all those problems and lived fearlessly, which makes me look up to him even more.

Kurt Cobain of Nirvana during the taping of MTV Unplugged at Sony Studios in New York City, 11/18/93. Photo by Frank Micelotta.

But let’s be honest we wouldn’t be talking about Kurt today if it wasn’t for his music. Nirvana was a revolutionary act. Before them, alternative music was considered underground music, only for a niche. But Nirvana made Alternative music mainstream. And thanks to them Alternative music still remains one of the top genres in terms of quality and content. Nirvana became famous with their global hit single ‘smells like teen spirit’, from their 1991 album “Nevermind”. The album also earned great reviews for them and a tour deal for two years. And in no time they became the most adored rock stars of early 90’s. Their sound was revolutionary, inspired by artists like Iggy Pop and Pixies, it made wave for a new kind of music. Their music was raw, unfiltered and loud and it always left an impact on you. They had the ability to get to you.

An entry from Kurt’s journal.

But let’s talk about Kurt’s lyrics for a minute. I know he said they don’t mean anything and it’s useless to try and find any deeper meaning in them. He also said what’s most important to him while writing songs are melodies, and he writes lyrics just around them. Now I don’t know, I certainly don’t more about his own music than him, but his lyrics mean so much to me. They speak to me. According to his band mates he was even obsessed over writing lyrics and spent a long time during the process. He also would often rearrange and rewrite lines while recording them in studio. Also his journals reveal his love for writing and poetry. Trust me, if you ever get a chance, read his journals. And even when he was one of the biggest stars, self doubt hadn’t left him. He often writes about feeling worthless and about his depressive periods in his journals. I find Kurt’s lyrics very similar to Sylvia Plath’s poetry. They are both simple on the surface but possess really dark themes and deep meaning in them, if you listen carefully. And nowhere is this more apparent than in the band’s third and last studio album, “In Utero”, which contains some of Kurt’s most heartbreaking lyrics ever. What makes his lyrics so emotional is that there is no bridge between the words and the man. It is raw and exposes every part of Kurt out for display. He talks to you and you talk back to him, and the words stay with you forever.

Kurt’s suicide note.

Well, now I know that this story doesn’t have a happy ending. I know about his drug addiction, I know about the controversies, I know about his destructive relationship with Courtney Love, I know about his struggles with fame and the pain it caused him, and I know that he killed himself. But I don’t want to remember all that today, that’s just the shadow of the man I love, which he couldn’t avoid any longer. It had been hanging there with him for a long time and his time had come. No, I want to remember the man who defied the shadow, the man who brought light when the sun was gone. I want to remember the man who loved to drink strawberry milk. I want to remember the man who loved making sketches of Donald duck. I want to remember the man who spoke about the poor and damaged, the man who gave them a voice. I want to remember the man who was one of the first feminists and LGBT+ rights activists. I want to remember the beautiful man who sang like an angle, and tried to make a change. I want to remember the real Kurt Cobain.

The Lizard at The Edge of the World

Walking through the roads of oblivion,
The path leads me to gloom that’s stygian
Heard someone on the way say,
“Tis’ the edge of the world you’re movin’ towards”
But I dunno, all I can see is fucking sand everywhere.

My legs need rest but there’s no car to hitchhike
And my car broke down a long time back,
The sun’s blazing hot with full glory
The fucker’s trynna kill me, I know it.
Its heat’s melting flesh right off my bone.

I am a dead rat being chased by a hawk.
I got nothing to do now, no one to see, nowhere else to go
I will die alone in here
Torn and tired, snakes laying eggs inside my skull
Nobody to remember me, nobody to cremate my ashes,
Styx will carry me to hell completing my passage.

“So you’re gonna die just like that?”
Did someone say something? Who was that?
I look around me but don’t see anyone,
But I swear I heard someone speak in my tongue
I feel something on my hand and turned my gaze,
A tiny desert lizard sits there starin’ at my face.
“O lizard, was that you speaking?”
“Yeah why, never heard a lizard talking?”
The desert must’ve messed my mind, I’m hallucinating
There’s a fucking talking lizard, and I’m starin’ at it.

“You don’t need to say anything,
I know the thoughts you’re thinking,
Dying alone, is that what you wished for?”
” I don’t know what I wish, but first tell who you are?”
“I’m a concept inside your head, but for you that’s too absurd.
So here I am in the form of something you know and understand.”

Suddenly I’m reminded of the lonely nights I spent alone in a room,
The only connection I had to the living world is not one you’d assume.
A lizard lived on the walls of my room, even though it didn’t pay any rent.
Until now I hadn’t thought of him, I don’t even know where it went.

“But what do you want from me?” I ask the lizard.
“Man, I don’t need anything from you, I’m one with the river,
It’s my duty to guide wandering travelers to the next world,
Because it’s only a few, who reach to the end of this world.
I gave Oedipus his kingdom and married him to his mom,
I helped Odysseus complete his journey and return to his home.
But something’s wrong with you boy, you seem lost.
Your mind’s become cloudy, you’re haunted by your past.
You have become weak, you think you’ve committed a sin,
You want to meet Hades, as if he’ll cure your pain.”

The lizard’s words hit me straight,
I have become what I tried to escape.
“O lizard, I have made a terrible mistake,
What do I need to do now, to awake?”

“Be brave boy, that’s all you gotta do
Wait for the opportunity and it’ll come to you.
And though I have to go now, you’ll always find me here,
But you mustn’t come back here soon, you must lose your fear.”

“She’s coming to get you, come on, be quick.
Just remember it’s only the brave ones who make it.”
The lizard disappeared before my awakening,
In the distant horizon I see an old car approaching.