Tag Archives: songs

Music Interviews: Fox Violet On Exploring The Subconcious Mind Through Her Music.

Would you please introduce yourself to the readers?


Hi! My name is Thea, my project is called Fox Violet, and I am the principle songwriter and singer.

What kind of music do you make or would like to make in the future?

This project is a blend between indie rock and dark rock pop with dreamscape elements.

What do you enjoy the most about the process of making music?

I really feel fulfilled by writing words that end up as music it truly gives my soul a big drink of sunshine. I love it and it keeps me going during this dark time in the world. The sharing is another core aspect that just makes everything worthwhile..

What are some of your favourite themes to explore through your music?

I love to explore the subconscious mind and subliminal messaging. I am fascinated by subtext and body language by what is not said, by those moments that really go un-noticed; the subtle parts of life that actually when held up under a mirror show us who we really are. I want honestly to create in a way that is not just about me though it may be influenced by my personal experience I want to shine a light out into the world..I hope to create more and more direct music as the goes on.

Who are some artists that you love or who you’d say has had a huge influence on your work?

Radiohead, Radiohead, Radiohead, and Radiohead!

Where can someone looking for your music, find it?
I am on all streaming platforms, so Spotify is the big one, and everywhere else.

What’s your favourite part about touring/ doing live performances?

I love to truly talk with people after a show to get their experience on it, it makes me the happiest in the world when a complete stranger comes up to me afterwards and genuinely seems to connect with what I am making.

What kind of message would you like to give your fans, through your music?

That is 1000000% ok to be weird, embrace your own weird, embrace your differences. It is the differences that will make you and create your own voice, one you should never alter or give up no matter what people expect of you, no matter what is cool or not. Be yourself, the people who don’t like it will fall away, the people who do will come to the front.

Where do you see yourself in the future, or what are you future plans ?

It is hard to answer that question right now with the state of the world being what it is. I just want to keep challenging myself and write music that keeps my integrity alive. Thank you.

Thanks, it was a pleasure talking to you. I’m really looking forward any future projects from you, and will be really excited for them.

Album Review: Women In Music Pt. III – The HAIM Sister Are Up to… Something.

Women In Music Pt. III; Haim

Rating – /Must listen if you’re a fan./

Haim – The Steps

The Haim sisters are known for their love of LA and taking walks on the sunny streets of the city, and it is also the feeling that carries on into their projects – little happy/sad sunny pop songs that go perfect with the mood of driving around Los Angeles on a summer morning. I really enjoyed their first album but to be honest I was kinda disappointed by their second as it really really didn’t have much to offer except the unique bright style the band has cultivated. This is where Women in Music Pt. III really succeeds, while it is still a collection of sunny happy/sad songs, it is also much more. With this album, it feels as though the Haim sisters are finally up to something – a big exploration of themselves and their journey.

The videos to accompany their third album, Women in Music Part III, nod to the strolls of the past and add in a few new twists. In “Now I’m in it” directed again by the master Paul Thomas Anderson, bassist Este and guitarist Alana carry Danielle (lead vocals, production, guitar) on a stretcher; when Danielle is revived and joins her sisters for their signature walk, she casts a knowing glance straight to camera. In another video, they’re followed by a gloomy saxophonist ; in another, they stand rooted to their spots. These videos show the evolution of Haim, whose songwriting on WIMPIII is likewise more nuanced, more self-aware, and frequently darker than ever before.

The biting satire of the album’s title is something of a red herring for its explicitly personal content. In interviews, each sister has described a personal trauma that she brought to the studio. Alana has spoken of the grief she suffered when a best friend passed away at age 20, and Este has talked about the low points of living with Type 1 diabetes. Most felt is Danielle’s deep depression; she traces its origin to when her partner (and co-producer) Ariel Rechtstaid was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2015.

Historically, Haim’s lyrics have been conversational and straightforward: emotionally incisive, sure, but usually vague enough that you could easily place yourself inside them. On WIMPIII, though, Danielle writes in vivid scenes, pulling you inside her personal depression fog. She blinks awake and finds herself at the wheel of a car; she watches TV and stares at the ceiling; she goes to the boulevard and can’t stop crying. On the stomping country-rock of “I’ve Been Down,” she sings about taping up the windows of her house, adding sardonically, “But I ain’t dead yet. Elsewhere, the sisters cut and paste the most offensive interview questions they’ve faced from music journalists (“Do you make the same faces in bed?”) into a candid folk song that channels the spirit of Joni Mitchell.

Danielle was also inspired by André 3000’s solo album The Love Below, an exploratory record that sewed together disparate genres with uninhibited slapstick humor. While WIMPIII is more theatrical than Haim have been before—there’s the gasp that opens the underwater rock song “Up From a Dream,” the “you up?” voicemail skits on “3 AM”—the most obvious similarity is in the band’s newfound musical fluidity. With signature production touches from Rostam throughout, these songs shift gears, often eschewing Haim’s usual summery rock to find the right genre for the mood, sometimes containing different shades within the same track. “All That Ever Mattered” peppers Danielle’s vocals with distorted screams and a mumbled interjection of “fuck no, before pirouetting away into a glam-rock guitar solo. “3 AM” and “Another Try” flirt with falsetto-driven funk and R&B, and “I Know Alone,” a song about depression-scrolling and sleeping through the day, contains dusty echoes of UK garage.

Not every song feels like a pioneering event. “Don’t Wanna” could have lived on any of Haim’s three albums: a tight pop-rock song built around an irrepressible guitar lick and an oblique story of a relationship in trouble. But their most exciting trips go off the beaten path, like the crystalline sad banger “Now I’m in It”—a song that wouldn’t have sounded out of place on Taylor Swift’s Lover. This may be the first Haim album that steps out of its retro groove long enough to draw parallels with other contemporary pop music, specifically Rechtshaid and Danielle’s recent work with Vampire Weekend. Having long since proven their chops when it comes to writing a breezy 1970s-style rock song, they now sound comfortable enough within their niche to push beyond it.

WIMPIII is bookended by two songs about L.A., both featuring a saxophone and wistful “doot-do-do” backing vocals. On the first, “Los Angeles,” Danielle describes falling out of love with her hometown. But in the final song, “Summer Girl”—while its melody hits a similarly melancholic vein—she interpolates Lou Reed as she sings about the relief of coming home to L.A. from tour to be with her partner. She’s anguished when she sings that she’s “thinking ’bout leaving” the city, but hushed and reverent on a later line when she reflects on how much she misses it: “L.A. on my mind, I can’t breathe.” Placed beside each other, the two songs take on new dimensions. It’s Haim as we haven’t quite heard them before: not just eminently proficient musicians, entertainers, and “women in music,” but full of flaws and contradictions, becoming something much greater.

Fav Tracks: //The Steps/ Up from a Dream/ Gasoline/ Don’t Wanna/ Leaning on you/ Man from the Magazine/ FUBT/ Bonus Tracks- Now I’m in it/ Hallelujah//

Least Fav Tracks- //Another Try//

Women In Music Pt III review

So what did you think Haim’s new album?

Do let me know in the comments!

Music Interviews: Vanilla Sugar ON Exploring Personal Experiences Through Her Music & More.

1. Would you please introduce yourself and tell the readers what you do ?

Hi! I am Vanilla Sugar – I play guitar / synths, and sing!


2. How did you start with music?

I started this on a midi keyboard and an iMac.


3. What kind of music do you make or would like to make in the future?

I create very synth heavy music, with a hint of pop and metal.


4. What do you enjoy the most about the process of making music?

I really enjoy vibing off the music once we create something that really jams. My favorite part is listening to it super loud in the car while driving home from the studio.


5. What are some of your favourite themes to explore through your music?

I like to talk about personal experiences a lot. I used to keep that to myself, but found that it helps me mentally to be able to be open about the darker part of me.


6. Who are some artists that you love or who you’d say has had a huge influence on your work?

I am a very big fan of Grimes and Mindless Self Indulgence.


7. Where can someone looking for your music, find it?

My new album is available on any of your favourite music retailers. I personally love listening to it on Spotify or Apple Music.


8. What’s your favourite part about touring/ doing live performances?

I love being able to see new parts of the world via music. I also really love being able to perform every night. It’s a truly freeing experience.


9. What kind of message would you like to give your fans, through your music?

You are never alone. There is always someone who feels the same way you do; it never hurts to reach out.


10. Where do you see yourself in the future, or what are you future plans for your career? 

I am going to be touring this September – December in the US and the UK. I hope to see you at a show!

Album Review: Chromatica – Lady Gaga’s Lukewarm comeback is tamed escapism.

Chromatica; Lady Gaga

Rating – //meh..// (but do listen if you’re a fan)

Lady Gaga – Chromatica

Singer, songwriter, record producer, (and also an actress now) Lady Gaga is back with her sixth full-length studio album, a glittery glossy electronic pop record that has been promised to be this big Comeback of sorts for Gaga. While, the album does feel much more grandeur and elaborate in it’s scope, with loud stretched out dance pop routines and lengthy butt-thumping electro-beats, the end result is just a generic and underwhelming record that just feels like a repackaging of the old stuff.

Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande – Rain On Me

Gaga’s career over the last few years have been a little lackluster. Coming from the pop queen sensation that she became upon her debut, her recent albums have lacked that edge and also the popularity among her fans. The only big hit Gaga has delivered in recent years, is her ‘Star is Born’ soundtrack, a movie which she starred in and earned her multiple Grammy and Oscar nominations, along with her chart topping duet with Bradley Cooper -‘Shallows”. But that was all Ally from the movie singing, it isn’t a Lady Gaga record. So, when Gaga announced this project and with it, her comeback to her glamorous image that she made for herself, fans got excited. And while Lady Gaga sure blasts out all horns here (literally), the result is quite mixed.

Lady Gaga – Chromatica

The album was designed and remixed right till its release with even the corona-virus pandemic affecting the direction of the album somewhat, as Gaga revealed herself. But thematically, this album is so out there and it talk about so many different things that it was hard for me follow, and its not like that the things she’s trying to say are some profound new ideas but rather cliches sold as LSD. “Earth is cancelled. I live on Chromatica,” Lady Gaga told Zane Lowe. OK, cool, but what the hell is Chromatica? According to Gaga, it is neither a fantasy nor fictional planet, but a perspective, an opportunity to re-frame pain into positivity. That said, the imagery of Chromatica is undeniably futuristic. The video for “Stupid Love” begins with a post-apocalyptic prologue: “The world rots in conflict. Many tribes battle for dominance. While the Spiritual ones pray and sleep for peace, the Kindness punks fight for Chromatica.” Again, big ideas and probably something interesting to explore through music, but when the whole theme of the song is explained in an opening exposition, followed by Gaga dancing with her minions in a short bright-pink dress to uninteresting catchy tunes, it’s hard to take the message seriously. As per traditions, there are tons of Gaga-isms sprinkled around in the album. I don’t mind them, I know that they are purposefully cheesy and I do love me some weird Gaga-ism in between songs, but then again it makes it hard for me to take the ‘big theme’ that she’s trying to convey seriously.

Lady Gaga, Blackpink – Sour Candy

Chromatica is an album that takes Gaga back to her fun pop roots of her early work, and while nothing on here is quite a banger like those early albums, her experience and vulnerability gives this albums the extra edge needed. While Gaga has long represented empowerment in pop, she often acknowledges that healing can be an uphill battle, especially when faced with physical or emotional trauma. Several songs on Chromatica seem to address her ongoing struggles with depression and PTSD. “My biggest enemy is me, ever since day one,” she sings, almost robotically, in the chorus of “911.” “Every single day, I dig a grave/Then I sit inside it, wondering if I’ll behave,” she coos on the booming “Replay.” But Gaga loves a triumph-over-hardship narrative, which Chromatica offers on songs like “Rain on Me,” “Plastic Doll,” and “Free Woman.”

Lady Gaga and Blackpink

From a production standpoint, Gaga goes all out on this album – each song has this get-your-ass-on-the-floor beat to it that is very in Gaga’s style. But the production is just way too loud for my taste, with songs that feel like are trying to poke your heart with the bass-thumping choruses. Especially. in the song ‘Stupid Love’ – it was torture to my ears, I recommend you to not listen to that songs with your headphones on. The albums has some big features on it too from her contemporary Ariana Grande, popular South Korean group Blackpink and even Elton John – and for the most part the features are big highlight for this album. I don’t necessarily love the song with Ariana – ‘Rain with Me’ – but the songs with Blackpink and Elton John are two of my favorites here.

Lady Gaga – Chromatica

So, while it might not be the dreamy comeback Lady Gaga promised it is sure an improvement from her last few albums. There are good songs in there with decent beats to bob along, and considering the ties we are living – it is the perfect sugary escapism that you might need right. But if you’re a stan, you’re probably gonna like this album anyway, because it essentially takes Gaga back to her pop origins. But, what I’m more interested to see is, how Lady Gaga evolves from here in the future.

Fav Tracks: //Plastic Doll/ Sour Candy (with Blackpink)/ 911/ Sine from Above (with Elton John)//

Least Fav Track: /Stupid Love/

Album Review: Notes on a Conditional Form – The experimental new record from the 1975 is truly an album for our Generation.

Notes on a Conditional Form; the 1975

Rating – “It’s great” / worth adding to your collection.

Notes on a Conditional Form begins, like all other the 1975 albums, with a track named ‘The 1975′ which samples audio from a Greta Thunberg speech. Greta talks in her melancholic voice about climate change and the human species’ losing battle with nature, as a really sombre piano piece is played in background. She urges people to perform civil disobedience and rebel against any sorts of politics that is keeping us from bringing about a change. But there lies the irony. You see, the 1975 are often criticised in the rock and roll music community for not being “rebellious” or “edgy” enough for an alternative/indie rock band. They are typically known to make clean synthesized ‘white girl’ music for teenagers with Matty Healy’s charming laid back observations of modern relationships. While, I don’t agree with those accusations, if you’re someone who believes them – you’re in for a surprise.

THE 1975 – NOTES ON A CONDITIONAL FORM

Notes on a Conditional Form is not your typical the 1975 album. Like I said earlier, they make it very clear right from the very first track that they are trying to explore something deeper on this And the theme they are trying to explore is our generation’s modern life and struggles. Matty says the reason Greta’s speech was sampled into the album was because they wanted to give her some sort of pop culture relevance for being the voice of our generation’s eco friendly demands. The theme is nothing new The 1975 though, their last album ‘A brief Inquiry into Online Relationships’ dealt with similar themes. In fact ‘Notes on a Conditional Form ‘ is a sequel to that album, in their third release cycle “Music for Cars”. Originally supposed to come only months after the first album, the production of the album got delayed and after a long recording sessions in 16 different studios, the album has has finally arrived more than a year after it’s initial release date. But that long stretched production has given this album a sound you couldn’t have imagined otherwise. This with out a doubt, the most experimental the 1975 has ever been. From hypno rock to elctro-dance pop and even heavy metal, this album is mixture of sounds from variety of genre – all distorted but still connected to form a really meaningful experience. I completed listening to the album and instantly went back again. The album consists of these very ambitious àmbient music that is really exceptional all guided by the 1975’s classic books to lift them up. Also there a a couple of alternative post rock tracks sprinkled in this record, and those were just some of the best listening experiences I have had this year.

the 1975 – Guys – NOTES ON A CONDITIONAL FORM

Matty’s laid back vocals with his observational song writing are still here on this album, but it’s much more introspective here. You can surely break them apart individually and find beautiful meaning in them. Matty said in an interview that the genesis of this album came from a time he watching watching Netflix alone in his room and immediately wanted more episodes as soon as the season ended. While that might not be a good analogy to explain the theme of this album, the theme of isolation runs throughout it. But the band’s secret weapon remains drummer and producer George Daniel, who has grown increasingly adept at matching Healy’s every whim as a songwriter. It’s easy to take for granted by now that, no matter what style the 1975 attempt, it will at least sound great. A slapstick country-emo travelogue? Go for it. A shoegaze snippet with Auto-Tuned ad-libs? Why not. A lush, futuristic Americana story-song? Fetch the pedal steel.

From a production stand point this is their most ambitious and intricate work yet. If the lyrics don’t tell a story, the music is telling an unified story in itself with its strange transition and sudden blows. The music packs a punch, you don’t know what to expect next as the 1975 change from one song to another. Which is ultimately my one gripe with this album, due so many unique sonic directions sometimes it feels lost and unmotivated. The songs don’t flow into each other naturally. But the tracks are finally bound together by a deep sense of isolation, which makes them great individually. For all its sonic experiments, Notes is filled with these quiet, self-affirming moments. If the 1975’s early work felt like pop music compulsively interrupted with provocations and footnotes, then Notes takes an inverse approach: It is a long, messy experiment that just so happens to peak with some of their sharpest songs. Yes, they have expressed some of these thoughts more succinctly in the past; and yes, the tracklist could be condensed so that you don’t have to clear your schedule to get through it. But when everything clicks, their work has never sounded so patient, so personal. And in the last song of album ‘Guys’, where it Matty sings about their early days and friendship among the band mates, all the societal and personal themes come together to form one beautiful mess.

In all of it’s experimentation and observational lyricism, Notes on a Conditional Form is truly an album for our Generation- with all the perils of of our times. In the song –  “If You’re Too Shy (Let Me Know),” a late-album highlight and their highest-charting single to date in the UK. Evolving from a slow-building intro into a mechanical chug, it is the record’s closest thing to a typical 1975 song—a glittery ’80s arrangement, a ridiculous saxophone solo, a charmingly sleazy hook. Matty sings about his obsession with the cam girl of his dreams – how he’s drawn towards the laptop every time and seduced into the screen by a girl he can’t meet. “I need to get back, I gotta see the girl on screen” Matty sings with bravado, and you’re left wondering if this is what the meaning of love and connection has come to in our digital age.

Fav Tracks – //The 1975/People/Frail State of Mind/Jesus Christ 2005 God Bless America/ Straming/ Roadkill/ The End (Music for Cars)/ If you’re too shy (let me know)/ Having no Head/Me and you together songs/ I think there’s something you should know/ Don’t Worry/ Guys//

Least Fav Track – Shiny Collarbone

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Jason Sheldon/Shutterstock (10567289o) The 1975 – Matty Healy The 1975 in concert at the Arena Birmingham, Birmingham, UK – 25 Feb 2020

You can listen to Notes on a Conditional Form by the 1975 here – https://open.spotify.com/album/0o5xjCboti8vXhdoUG9LYi?si=crfp7HfXSG2iCRoJ6ZuhFA

Music Interviews: “Heart & Hand Grenades” Talk about being a hard rock band based in buffalo.

  1. Would you guys please introduce yourselves and explain your role in the band?

We are Hearts & Hand Grenades, a Buffalo born hard rock band. We’ve got Stephanie Wlosinski on bass and lead vocals, Mike Bress on rhythm guitar and keys, Kenny Blesy on lead guitar, and Tom Lafferty on drums.

2. Where did you guys meet and how did you form this band?

We all met through the cover music scene here in Buffalo. Stef and I started playing in bands together about eight years ago in a local rock band. Somewhere along the way we met Tom and Kenny in the scene, we became friends, and even started jamming together at some gigs. It wasn’t until Stef and I performed at a local telethon in early 2019 that we decided it was time to get our own original project going. This was due Robby Takac from the Goo Goo Dolls who approached us afterward and insisted we get in his Studio GCR and get the music laid down. We then approached Kenny and Tom to get them on board and here we are.

  1. What kind of music do you make or would like to make in the future?

We are all about the hard rock. When we recorded our first EP ‘Wait’ we knew we wanted to make great hard rock songs. We ended up doing just that. We soon got to work on our second EP ‘Nothing Left’ and felt even stronger with the music as we moved toward our goal of being classified as a hard rock band. With our third EP release ‘Adrenaline’, I think we’ve arrived at our goal. The latest EP is full of some powerhouse rock music.

  1. What do you enjoy the most about the process of making music together?

The creativity of building a song from scratch is the most fun for us. I like sitting down with a blank piece of paper and watching a song being born. From that first moment when you have that sweet guitar riff in your head, and you are able to build that into a complete idea is just great. It is very satisfying to see everyone put their thoughts and ideas into making the songs what they are in the end.

  1. What are some of your favourite themes to explore through your music?

There are a lot that we’ve portrayed in the songs we released already. I’d have to say the dominant themes reside around hopelessness, anger, and frustration. Everyone in their lives has a story surrounding these at any given time. It is natural to take an idea in this area and run with it. Some are fiction and some are not.

  1. Who are some artists that you love or who you’d say has had a huge influence on your work?

I’d say going back to the early eighties with Judas Priest, Metallica, and AC/DC is where we draw a lot of influence from. Those guitar riffs and the overall feel of the songs were just ground-breaking. They have stood the test of time and you can hear their style and play of music in a ton of hard rock bands out there today.

  1. Where can someone looking for your music, find it?

Our music is available for streaming everywhere. You can find us on platforms like Spotify, Pandora, YouTube, Deezer, Jango, etc. It is also available for purchase from iTunes, Amazon Music, Google Play, etc.

  1. What’s your favourite part about touring/ doing live performances?

Our absolute favorite thing about playing live is the rush. There is nothing better than standing up on that stage with loads of screaming fans standing before you. It is amazing to see them getting into music that you have created. I still remember the first time I saw a fan singing the lyrics to our music back and that really gave me a chill. I knew we were destined for some amazing things at that moment.

  1. What kind of message would you like to give your fans, through your music?

Through our music, I guess I wouldn’t have a specific topic that I would keep pushing. We write our songs on the edge of our seats. The ideas come to us, and we lay them down. At one moment we might talk about finding out your deepest secret or needing a fix. It’s really just whatever idea we had at the moment we were writing the song.

  1. Where do you guys see yourselves in the future, or what are your future plans for the band?

We see ourselves on the big stages in the next couple of years. We are actively looking at putting a tour together so we can hit the road and get our music out of the Buffalo area live for everyone to be a part of. We got into this for the long haul and look forward to every little moment along the way.

Orpheus in the Underworld

Late night at the fortress, high, 
Higher than a kite in the sky,
Surrounded by people smelling of piss and sweat 
Dirty walls holding tears of it's thousand inmates.

Segregated and kept separated
Beaten and tortured until broken
Locked in these cells like animals, who don't cooperate,
Spend forever here on charges of crimes against the state.

Blades run for those who disobey,
Killing all that comes on it's way,
Chains bind them to their doom,
Going mad together in this tomb.

My mind's intoxicated, all my senses blurred
Thoughts pummel my head, bordering on the absurd
I need to get to Raven,I need to fortify her
But the visions in front me form a constant blur.

Inside the cages filled with golden canaries,
These walls hide their most priced possession,
A hundred year old bard,
With long flowing hairs and beard
Whiter than Gandalf, from the darkness appeared
Growling in a voice, strong enough to persuade even the purest
To melt even the strongest
And to cure even the sickest.
Blinded by the light, I bow down on one knee
And listen to Orpheus go on a recitation spree.







Album Review: Fetch the Bolt Cutters – Fiona Apple’s fifth record is bonkers and deliriously beautiful.

FETCH THE BOLT CUTTERS – FIONA APPLE (Alternative/Indie)

Rating – “It’s great” / worth adding to your collection.

According to recent “New Yorker” article, “Fetch the Bolt Cutters” is a reference to a scene in “The Fall,” the British police procedural starring Gillian Anderson as a sex-crimes investigator; Anderson’s character calls out the phrase after finding a locked door to a room where a girl has been tortured. This theme of crimes against women, men in power and femininity appears throughout the whole album. Like all of Apple’s projects, this one was taking a long while to emerge, arriving through a slow-drip process of creative self-interrogation that has produced, over a quarter century, a narrow but deep songbook. But that time surely helped Fiona in the direction of the album, since in between all those years she kept quiet, big movements like The #Metoo Movement has shaped the entertainment industry.

Fiona Apple has been in the business for 25 years now, but this is only her fifth full length album. And while she has always worked under a male producer in her early career, this is her first album that she has produced herself and she has made to let it all loose. Musically, this is easily the craziest and most bonkers production on an album I have heard this year. And unless you can find another song from this year that features a dog’s bones as percussion, I’ll have to say that my claim is right. It has some of the most innovative sonic directions on a recent EP, even considering Fiona’s standards. For example the title track – Fetch the Bolt Cutters – features a dog’s barking noise as bass and Fiona’s orgasmic noises in the outro, Also on the opening track – I Want You to Love Me – the singer hiccups in ecstasy, facing off against an arpeggiating piano as though competing to climax first. And the piano in here is a masterpiece in itself, but that’s obvious, given Fiona’s reputation as pianist.

Lyrically too, Fiona is taking a lot of shots in this album. Just like the Strokes album from last week (another artist making a comeback this year), there’s a lot of looking back in this albums. Fiona looks back at her childhood in New York, growing up as a musical prodigy and getting fame at an early age of 17 in the uneasy times of 90’s. Men in power who who use women for their benefits and sexual predators are definitely are the first target of Fiona. And even though the music behind the song is overblown, Fiona doesn’t compensate on the lyrics, the songs here are very wordy, even more than they’ve ever been. What set’s the lyrics in this project apart, is that even though it’s dealing with such heavy subjects – they are funny as hell. But that’s not all in here, Fiona talks about past relationships, bad boyfriends, her younger self and even takes shots at high society culture. In fact major her own mind and trying to figure herself out by glancing at the past is one of the major themes. “I would beg to disagree, but begging disagrees with me,” she swaggers on Under the Table, a wickedly funny song about how she is a nightmare date at pompous dinner parties. (“Kick me under the table all you want.”)

Fav Tracks – I Want You to Love Me/ Shameika/ Fetch the Bolt Cutters/ Under The Table/ Newspaper/ Ladies/ Drumset/ On I go/ Cosmonauts/ Rack of life/

Least Fav Track – Heavy Baloon

In conclusion, all I want to say is this it is a really good album that doesn’t fear to take any risks and even if you are not into R&B or indie music, you should definitely give this album a listen. I mean it’s not like you have much else to do right now. Trust me, give it a try and maybe you will be able to appreciate all it’s weirdness too.

And meanwhile, do let me know what you thought about the album in the comments!

“Sing to me, Muse”

Rising Sun in the rear mirror.
Brittle breeze sniffing on the red scarf
That she wraps around her neck
Hiding the tattoo she was given at birth.

The wretched river follows us right by the side
Of the road we’ve been ridin’ through all night
Through dark forests that smell of dead corpse
Filled with fireflies and nymphs playing harps.

She looks like she was brought down from heaven
Just for me,
She’s the one they call by the name ‘Raven’
She’s come to set me free.

She’s more beautiful than I can comprehend
Her eyes looking at me with reminiscence
Her face makes me wanna sing
In voices I can’t listen.

I don’t know where she’s leading me,
But I want to follow her
No matter how far
It’s not like I have a bigger purpose to serve.

She shines with a glistening glow
As the newborn sun kisses her face.
“Your life’s shorter than your shadow,
Ever wonder why you’re here, what’s your place?”

Born in the city of bones, I have never been bold
All my life I have done as I was told.
The thought of my place in this world never appeared
Or it did, and I taught myself to not think hard.

She turns her head and whispers, staring into my soul
“I know you have stories to tell, Sing them to me all”

I have always had a guitar
I want to play it to her
And even though I never learned to play it
I hit the strings, making up words to go with it.

“Sing to me, that’s all I ask of you
When the time comes, you will leave and forget all about me
But I want you to remember the songs you sing right now
Keep em’ and one day when you’re old, sing them in memory of me.”

“Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns
The man who sits on his throne, as the whole world burns”

Album Review: The New Abnormal by The Strokes

**Before I begin, since this is my first review on the blog I think I should explain my rating system here. I don’t want to use the usual star or number rating system as I’m unable to put my verdict of something I consume in numerical terms. Instead, I’ll try to rate them in terms of what I feel of them. So here’s the rating metric I’m going to use, from best to worst :

  1. Instant / Classic
  2. “It’s great” / worth adding to your collection.
  3. Must listen/ see/ read if you’re a fan.
  4. //stream it once it’s free//
  5. //meh..//
  6. //fun for the high time//
  7. //skip it.//
  8. Horrendous. Piece. Of. Shit.

So i guess we’re good to go.**

THE NEW ABNORMAL – THE STROKES

Rating – “It’s great” /worth adding to your collection.

Okay, I should tell you that this is my first Strokes album. I was born in 2001, so I missed out on the early 2000s hype surrounding them. And their work since then has really been sub-par, with a really uneventful 2010s for them. But I know about them and I understand why they’re so beloved by so many. I have listened to their earlier music and I love it. So, when I heard “At the Door”, their latest single from their new album, I was super hyped. I was about to witness my first Strokes album.

And honestly I’m not disappointed. After seven years of hiatus have finally come back with an album which is possibly their best since their 2006 album “First impressions of the truth.” And what better, they have matured a lot since then, which is very evident on this project. The Strokes are known to look back at earlier periods like the eighties and pay homage to them, and while they still do that in this album, they are also looking back at something more. They are reminiscing at their early times as a band, New York from when they were young and past friendships and relationships among others. This nostalgia drives the sound of this album. The guitar riffs and over the top synths are very 80’s in here, which is very classic of the Strokes, yet they add to that sound in here. They beautifully nudge between poppy dance rock and ambient rock ballads, supported by the high pitched falsetto of Julian Casablancas and his extraordinary vocal abilities.

Lyrically too, The Strokes have matured a lot. Their ideas are more clear and easy to digest in this album. The lyrics are simple and dark, and while it might seem pretentious at some points, Julian’s delivery makes them work. The themes of the album are petty universal, so almost anybody will be able to connect to the lyrics. Also, the writing here is really witty and smart which adds to the fun of the songs. While there’s no storyline per se in the album, the overall themes connect beautifully. Each track has it’s own thing to say and they all together complete the story that the Strokes are trying to paint here. For example the opening track “The Adults are Talking” is shot at people in power or rich businessmen, followed by “Selfless” which is a rock ballad where Julian sings about an old romance, while the album ends on “An ode to the Mets” where The strokes talk about their childhood memories and give a tribute to their city – New York.

Fav Tracks: At the Door, Ode to the Mets, Bad decisions, Brooklyn Bridge to Chorus, Selfless, The Adults are Talking, Not The same anymore.

Least Fav Tracks: Why Are Sunday’s so Depressing

Overall, I loved this album. While it might not be a classic like The Stroke’s debut album “Is this It”, “The New Abnormal” is the best work they have put out in recent memory. It is great album and if you love the Strokes, you should definitely buy it and add it to your collection.

So that’s it for this, I’ll be back with another review shortly. Do let me know what you thought about the album in the comment below!